Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir
Tonight, the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir, led by Ton Koopman, performs an all-Bach program at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall as part of Great Performers.
The Ensemble’s major honors include a Gramophone Award, Diapason d’Or, Stern des Monats-Fono Forum, the Prix Hector Berlioz and two Edison Awards. Quite the resume!  
 

Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir

Tonight, the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir, led by Ton Koopman, performs an all-Bach program at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall as part of Great Performers.

The Ensemble’s major honors include a Gramophone Award, Diapason d’Or, Stern des Monats-Fono Forum, the Prix Hector Berlioz and two Edison Awards. Quite the resume!  

 

The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir, a dedicated group of Baroque specialists led by the boundless energy and enthusiasm of Ton Koopman, brings its unique sound to Lincoln Center for an all-Bach program on March 15 as part of Great Performers.

 

(Photo by Marco Borggreve)
JUST RELEASED: The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir will perform an all-Bach program on March 15 at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, as part of the 2011-2012 Great Performers series.
One of the leading authorities on Baroque music, conductor Ton Koopman, returns to Lincoln Center with his Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir, bringing three examples of Bach’s loveliest sacred choral music for an Alice Tully Hall concert on Thursday, March 15. This Great Performers evening will feature two beloved Cantatas, BWV 104 and 147, and his Magnificat in D Major. The vocal soloists are Teresa Wakim, soprano; Bogna Bartosz, alto; Tilman Lichdi, tenor; and Klaus Mertens, bass-baritone.The Good Shepherd is the theme of Cantata 104 (Du Hirte Israel, höre or Hear thou, shepherd of Israel), composed in Leipzig in 1724 for the second Sunday after Easter. Composed originally in 1716 in Weimar, Cantata 147 (Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben) was revised by Bach during his Leipzig years and premiered in an expanded version in 1723 for the Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which was celebrated in July at that time. Over the years it has become custom to perform it on the first Sunday in Advent. This Cantata includes two chorale movements of some of Bach’s most recognized music, known to modern audiences as “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.”Taken from one of the most ancient Marian hymns, Bach’s D Major Magnificat premiered in 1733 in Leipzig for the Feast of the Visitation. The text is from the Gospel of Luke and recounts Mary’s visit to her older cousin, Elizabeth, who is seemingly barren. When Mary greets her cousin, her unborn child (who will grow up to be John the Baptist) moves in Elizabeth’s womb, and Elizabeth praises Mary for her faith. Mary then sings the hymn known as the Magnificat in response.
(Read the entire press release here.)
 

(Photo by Marco Borggreve)

JUST RELEASED: The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir will perform an all-Bach program on March 15 at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, as part of the 2011-2012 Great Performers series.

One of the leading authorities on Baroque music, conductor Ton Koopman, returns to Lincoln Center with his Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir, bringing three examples of Bach’s loveliest sacred choral music for an Alice Tully Hall concert on Thursday, March 15. This Great Performers evening will feature two beloved Cantatas, BWV 104 and 147, and his Magnificat in D Major. The vocal soloists are Teresa Wakim, soprano; Bogna Bartosz, alto; Tilman Lichdi, tenor; and Klaus Mertens, bass-baritone.

The Good Shepherd is the theme of Cantata 104 (Du Hirte Israel, höre or Hear thou, shepherd of Israel), composed in Leipzig in 1724 for the second Sunday after Easter. Composed originally in 1716 in Weimar, Cantata 147 (Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben) was revised by Bach during his Leipzig years and premiered in an expanded version in 1723 for the Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which was celebrated in July at that time. Over the years it has become custom to perform it on the first Sunday in Advent. This Cantata includes two chorale movements of some of Bach’s most recognized music, known to modern audiences as “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.”

Taken from one of the most ancient Marian hymns, Bach’s D Major Magnificat premiered in 1733 in Leipzig for the Feast of the Visitation. The text is from the Gospel of Luke and recounts Mary’s visit to her older cousin, Elizabeth, who is seemingly barren. When Mary greets her cousin, her unborn child (who will grow up to be John the Baptist) moves in Elizabeth’s womb, and Elizabeth praises Mary for her faith. Mary then sings the hymn known as the Magnificat in response.

(Read the entire press release here.)